Courses Structure

 MSD Program Structure
I. Core MSD Courses

All students must complete the following four required core courses.

Courses Cr. Hr Pre-requisites(s)
MSD 610 Full Custom IC Design 3
MSD 620 ASIC and FPGA Design 3
MSD 690 VLSI System Design 3 MSD 610 or MSD 620
II. Specialized MSD Courses (Depth)

M.Sc. students must complete three or four specialized courses to satisfy the depth requirement .M.Eng. students must complete three or four specialized courses.

Courses Cr. Hr
MSD 601 Integrated Circuit Engineering 3
MSD 602 Sensors, Actuators, and MEMS 3
MSD 611 Analysis and Optimization of High-Performance Integrated Circuits 3
MSD 630 Analog Integrated Circuit Design
MSD 631 RF Microelectronics
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MSD 640 Computer-Aided IC Design 3
MSD 680 Selected Topics in Microelectronics System Design 3
MSD 689 Directed Study 3
III. Elective Courses (Breadth) 

Elective courses are chosen from other graduate programs in the CIT area (General CIT, Wireless Technologies, Information Security, Software Engineering, etc.) The choice of electives must be approved by the program director. M.Sc. students must complete two or three elective courses to satisfy the breadth requirement. M.Eng. students must complete two or three courses.

IV. Management of Technology and Business Courses 

M.Sc. students must complete 3 credits in Management of Technology and/or Business. M.Eng. students must take a minimum of 3 and up to a maximum of 6 credits of courses.

V. Thesis

MSc. MSD students must successfully complete and defend a master thesis. MEng. MSD students must complete 9 cr. hr. of course work in lieu of thesis.


 Course Descriptions
MSD 610 Full Custom IC Design

– Three Credit Hours
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This course focuses on the design of digital IC blocks in CMOS technology from the bottom up. Design rules and layout. Static, dynamic, pass gates, and other logic families. Sequential circuits, arithmetic circuits, data path structures, and memories. Interconnect and I/O design. Clock and power distribution networks Testing and reliability.

MSD 620 ASIC and FPGA Design

– Three Credit Hours
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Overview of Computer Aided Design tool flow for ASIC and FPGA Design. Synthesis from hardware description languages and creation of finite state machines. Differences between FPGA and ASIC design flows. Exploration of concepts in several projects.

MSD 690 VLSI System Design

– Three Credit Hours
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Prerequisite: MSD 610 or MSD 620 Design of a cutting-edge VLSI chip. Teams of 3 to 5 students undertake a large circuit design problem, going from specification to VLSI implementation while optimizing for speed, area, and/or power. Group collaboration and engineering design

MSD 601 Integrated Circuit Engineering

– Three Credit Hours
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IC Technology. Basic processing technology and layout fundamentals. Design and layout of MOS and BJT transistors, capacitors, and resistors. Memory technology: static and dynamic RAMs, ROMs, CAMs. Models for computer aided analysis. Economics of large scale integration.

MSD 602 Sensors, Actuators

– Three Credit Hours
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This course introduces fabrication and design fundamentals for on-chip sensor and actuator systems having micron-scale dimensions. Basic principles covered include microstructure fabrication, mechanics of silicon and thin-film materials, electrostatic force, capacitive motion detection, fluidic damping, piezoelectricity, piezoresistivity, and thermal micromechanics. Applications covered include pressure sensors, micro mirror displays, accelerometers, and gas micro sensors.

MSD 611 Analysis and Optimization of High-Performance Integrated Circuits

– Three Credit Hours
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Prerequisite: MSD 610 This course discusses issues that arise in the design and analysis of VLSI circuits at high speed. Technology scaling trends in CMOS. Power consumption and low power design. Interconnect design and delay modeling. Inductance effects. Static Timing Analysis. Noise. Thermal effects.

MSD 630 Analog Integrated Circuit Design

– Three Credit Hours
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This course will familiarize students with advanced analog integrated circuit (IC) design issues highlighting major analog building blocks and circuit techniques. Specific topics include MOSFET device modeling, noise analysis, op-amp design and compensation, and reference circuits. Special attention is given to analog-to-digital converters, and digital-to-analog converters.

MSD 631 RF Microelectronics

– Three Credit Hours
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Introduction to the design of radio-frequency integrated circuits (RFICs). Transceiver architectures, transistor models, passive component models, MOS and bipolar low-noise amplifiers, mixers, voltage-controlled oscillators, phase-locked loops, baseband circuits.

MSD 640 Computer-Aided IC Design

– Three Credit Hours
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This course opens up the important CAD tools that perform the many steps of the transformation from high-level descriptions to masks. Mathematical models, algorithms, formulations and data structures. Algorithms for floor planning, circuit partitioning, placement and routing. Circuit simulation. Digital and mixed-mode simulation. Optimization. Statistical IC design.

MSD 680 Selected Topics in Microelectronics System Design

– Three Credit Hours
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This course is tailored to introduce students to the latest advances in various fields of Microelectronics System Design, and/or to focus on a specific area of particular interest to the discipline. Contents of the course may vary from one semester to another. A student may repeat the course for credit, provided that the selection of topics is different. Repeating the course for credit requires the approval of the program director.

MSD 689 Directed Study

– Three Credit Hours
GalleryImage />In this course, students follow an in-depth directed study in a given topic or field of their choice under the close supervision of a faculty member. If the topic or field of study is in an area of specialization in Microelectronics, it may count towards the Specialized MSD (or Depth) requirement. Otherwise, it may count towards the Elective (or Breadth) requirement. A student may repeat the course for credit, provided that the topic or field of choice is different. Repeating the course for credit requires the approval of the program director.

 


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